Five Years Later…

Stats ‹ Bob on Books — WordPress com

I received this little recognition from WordPress, where my blogs are hosted, on Sunday. A day after I registered, I wrote my first post, Writing on Reading, and took the plunge into the world of blogging. That was on August 13, 2013.

It has been, on the whole, a delightful journey. What has made it so special are the interactions with so many who follow the blog, either on WordPress, or via social media. Many of those interactions are online, and often, I feel I am learning as much as I’m sharing. Perhaps some of the most delightful interactions, though, are with people I would call “anonymous followers” who I run into at a conference or other gathering and tell me how much they appreciated a particular post, or the blog more generally. It reminds me that there is a world of readers out there beyond the comments and the likes and the stats.

But if you like stats, here are a few. Currently 1099 people follow the blog. Actually, a month ago this number was more like 3300, but included all my Facebook friends on my personal profile as well as my WordPress followers. Facebook changed their policy recently and would only count and allow posting to those on your Facebook Page. Actually, that’s OK, because the current number is a more honest reflection of those really interested. Over the past five years, I’ve written 1630 posts and, as of writing had 301,787 visitors and 439,774 views on the blog. That’s an average of 240 views a day over five years–which in blogging circles is modest success.  The all-time top post was Growing Up in Working Class Youngstown — The Top 10 (from 2015) that has had 19,966 views to date. Nearly since the beginning, I’ve posted six days a week, taking Sundays off, with a couple of breaks, one for a conference I was directing, another for emergency foot surgery.

Somewhere over the past five years, I went from posting book reviews to becoming a reviewer. The transition was one of simply reviewing whatever I read to developing relationships with various publishers to review newly published books, either in print or e-galley form, sometimes before the books were published. I’ve learned the value of becoming a reliable reviewer, producing clear content related to a book in a timely fashion. The payoff is the chance to review more of that publisher’s books. Sometimes I’ve had the chance to interact with authors as well. I love it when an author reads a review, and whatever I thought of the book, says, “you understood what I was trying to say.” It is gratifying when I learn that I’ve been able to connect an author whose work I deeply appreciate with a reader who will find the work amusing, informative, or even, on occasion, transformative.

Booksellers are another group of my heroes. In the age of online sales, I so appreciate the work of those who curate a selection of books in a way that is responsive to their customers, work hard to build a customer base, host book events, and attempt to pay the bills every month. I appreciate those who have taken the time to let me into their world, even a little.

I mentioned a Youngstown post earlier. This was something I think I fell into by accident. It began with a post where I talked about one of these conversation exercises used at conferences. The question was, “what is something I probably don’t know about you that you should ask me about?” My answer was “what it was like growing up in working class Youngstown.” I wrote a post about that and someone said I should write some more about that. Early on, I wrote a post about food, which exploded when I posted it in some Youngstown Facebook groups. For the past four years I’ve been learning about everything from ethnic foods to city founders, reading more than a few Youngstown books, writing about it, and then learning a ton more from the comments of others. I’ve discovered that to know who you are, you need to know where you’ve come from.

Downsides? There is the struggle of every writer to figure out what you want to say and then making the words on the screen reflect the ideas in your head. Mercifully, I’ve had few “trolls”–perhaps I’m not that interesting. I’ve learned that your website can be wrongly blacklisted, and it can take months to undo. It happens often enough that there are businesses who deal with this stuff. Add this to all the ways people try to defraud you online and offline….

To end on a positive note, I have to give a shout out to the folks at WordPress, who have designed software that is easy to work with and gets you online quickly. Beyond that, I’ve found their support people among the very best to work with whenever I’ve had a question or problem. Most of the time, it all just works so seamlessly that you forget all the people working behind the scenes that make it work. After five years, though, it seems appropriate to say thanks to the folks at WordPress that help my voice be heard, my reviews seen, and all those great Youngstown conversations to happen. Thank you, WordPress!

I’m in the PhishTank

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I learned yesterday that Bob on Books is considered a “suspicious” or “malicious” site by Twitter. I can no longer post links to the site there, although I can make other posts.

A chat session with WordPress support (who I’ve always found helpful) indicated that I’ve been listed as a “phishing” site on PhishTank.com. Here is the link to the actual listing. WordPress itself found nothing on the site that is malicious or violates its terms of service and asserts that third parties can’t embed code or links on sites they host. No one who has visited my site has reported an actual problem. Phishing involves attempts to deceive you into providing sensitive information like passwords or credit cards under false pretexts in order to defraud. There is nothing like that on my site.

Apparently, on April 10, someone going by the username “prodigyabuse” listed Bob on Books as a phishing site. This individual has submitted over 11,000 sites. I found out that others “verified” that my site is a “phishing” site even though WordPress has examined the site and found nothing wrong, and it shows up trusted on Microsoft and Chrome browsers. I subsequently learned someone on a university computer couldn’t access my site, which I suspect is not an isolated incident. It’s likely that Twitter has based its “block” of content from Bob on Books on this site.

I’ve submitted “tickets” to both Twitter and PhishTank to rectify the situation. No response so far.

I find this deeply disturbing, because the effect of this is to suppress free speech. Apparently:

  • This can be done by a few individuals, working together or in sympathy.
  • There appears to be no actual verification by PhishTank or those who use their listings of the website. They rely entirely on user reports.
  • Site owners receive no direct notice of this action.
  • I could find no way to talk, even via chat to an actual person either on Twitter or PhishTank.
  • There appears to be no protection against this.

No doubt there are actual phishing sites, but as it stands now, the burden of proof is on site owners that they are not phishing, when they learn this is going on.

If your register as a user at PhishTank and go to my link and click, “something wrong with this submission” and follow the instructions you can submit a report they say they will take “very seriously.” We’ll see, but I’d be glad for the support.

I’m wondering why this happened. There seem to be a few possibilities:

  • One is that some people just don’t like what I’m posting, which is particularly troubling.
  • A second is some spammer I’ve blocked is having his/her revenge. There is a lot of spam commenting, some of which contain links to “phish-y” sites.
  • That leads to something more sinister. It does appear that it is fairly common for hackers to hide files deep inside the WordPress software and files. I found a number of articles like this one describing the problem. Both the software in my version of WordPress’s JetPack and my own virus and malware software do not show anything, and I don’t use plug-ins that are most vulnerable to this. There are expensive services that will clean your site, and more robust security options are available with more expensive WordPress plans. WordPress.com asserts that it is not possible for malicious entities to embed phishing code or links on blogs hosted on their site (which is the case with my blog), but leave it to their end users to deal with false reports. Seems like they would have more clout than I do.
  • Maybe this has to do with the cover photo (see above) I recently posted on my Facebook page, taken at our local aquarium. Maybe my fish tank picture got me in the PhishTank! Probably not but one must maintain some humor with these things.

Needless to say, this is unsettling. I love looking at fish in a tank or aquarium, but am not particularly crazy about being in one.