Review: Sculptor Spirit

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Sculptor SpiritLeopoldo A. Sanchez M. (Foreword by Oscar Garcia-Johnson). Downers Grove: IVP Academic, 2019.

Summary: Starting from a “Spirit Christology,” explores five models by which the Spirit shapes our lives in the likeness of Christ.

For many of us, this work will break ground in two ways. The first is that it will introduce us to the idea of “Spirit Christology.” In the author’s words:

“A Spirit Christology focuses on the presence and activity of the Holy Spirit in the life and the mission of Jesus. It asks what the identity of Jesus as the receiver, bearer, and giver of God’s Spirit contributes to our theological reflection and Christian living.”

For Sanchez, this does not replace, but rather complement a “logos Christology,” which focuses on the meaning and nature of the Incarnation, of God become man, the Word become flesh, fully human and fully divine. Rather, to observe what it means for Jesus to live, die, and be raised in the fullness of the Spirit sheds valuable light on how we might be formed in Christ.

This brings us to the second way this book breaks ground. Sanchez proposes five models for the Holy Spirit’s work of sanctifying us, or “sculpting” us in Christ’s image. Each complements the others and is an aspect of this sculpting work. The five models are:

  1. Renewal: The recurring dying and being raised to new life as we return to the cross in daily repentance toward God, reconciliation toward others, and embrace of our new identity in Christ.
  2. Dramatic: This is the model of standing firm when faced with spiritual attacks through dependence upon the Spirit who intercedes for us in prayer and empowers the ministry of the Word and the affirmation of our baptism as a “little exorcism.”
  3. Sacrificial: Attention here is focused on the life of serving with excellence in our callings and sharing through “happy exchanges” of mutual care where we each give what we have and receive what we need in partnerships.
  4. Hospitality: Following the example of Jesus’ hospitality, the practice of welcoming strangers and the marginalized, participating in the Spirit’s work of calling people from the margins.
  5. Devotional: The worship of God through Spirit-given rhythms of work, play, and rest.

In elaborating these models, Sanchez considers pictures of the Spirit’s work in the life of Jesus and elsewhere in scripture, catechetical models drawing upon the early fathers who wrote about the Holy Spirit (Irenaeus of Lyon, Cyril of Jerusalem, Athanasius of Alexandria, Didymus the Blind,  Ambrose of Milan, and St. John Chrysostom). As a Lutheran theologian, he also draws on the theology of Martin Luther, making a case that Luther had a theology of sanctification, as well as one of justification. In his treatment of these theologians, he identifies catechetical images for each model from their writings.

One of the highlights of this work was to view this discussion through the eyes of a Hispanic theologian and church leader. This was most evident for me in the chapter on hospitality, or welcoming the stranger. For example, he writes of the bittersweet and painful experience of mestizaje, the forced coming together of races in the Spanish conquest and colonization of the New World. Despite the violence and even death, under the cross, a new people was created–mestizo people, yes–but also revealing the church catholic–not monocultural or monolinguistic–accepted without shame at the foot of the cross.

Sanchez concludes this work by sketching how these five models help us tell the story of Jesus in the world–how Jesus came filled with and bearing the Spirit, and how the Spirit meets us and forms us in Christ. An appendix offers a chart that summarizes the five models and his elaboration of them and an extensive bibliography is provided.

It has been encouraging in recent years to see the growth in Trinitarian theology. This book is an important contribution in exploring the intimate relationship of Jesus, the Spirit, and the believer. It moves away from inordinate focus on the Spirit or the silence of a binatarian theology. It offers a well-rounded vision of the work of the Spirit in forming us to be like Christ.

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Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

One thought on “Review: Sculptor Spirit

  1. Pingback: The Month in Reviews: March 2019 | Bob on Books

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